Glossary

•Building wire: Commercial wires used in the building trades.

•Communication wire: Wires used for voice and data transmissions.


•Conduit: A channel for holding and protecting conductors and cables, usually circular in cross section like a pipe.


•Dielectric strength: The maximum voltage a conductor insulation can withstand, expressed in volts per mil of insulation thickness.


•Electrical outlet/switch boxes: Rigid vinyl box-like components used to hold and protect wires and cables under floors and behind walls.


•Fiber optic cabling: Cables designed to facilitate the transfer of computer data, video, voice signals and the like through laser-generated light carried in bundles of ultrapure, transparent fiber.


•Fittings: The joint pieces used to attach two or more lengths of rigid vinyl conduit.


•Jacketing: The material, commonly vinyl, which is applied on the outside of a wire or cable. In U.S. markets, this is typically referred to as jacketing, while the term sheathing is used frequently in non-U.S. markets.


•Non-metallic jacketed cable (NM): A cable assembly consisting of insulated conductors jacketed with a nonmetallic material (usually vinyl).


•Plenum: A space where structural environmental air is handled. Many electrical products are designed and rated specifically for plenum areas.


•Power cable: A cable of various sizes, various construction and insulation used to supply power to a variety of types of equipment.


•Raceway: An enclosed channel designed expressly for holding conductors and cables, including conduit and tubing, wireways, and busways.


•Service entrance cable (SER/SEU): The conductors that connect the service conductors to the service equipment of the building.


•Single conductors: A conductor consisting of a single wire.


•Underground feeder cable (UF): The circuit conductors between the service equipment and the final branch circuit overcurrent device.